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Survey: Developers Not Jumping on Vista Bandwagon

Evans Data research indicates only eight percent of developers in North America are writing applications for Vista, even though the OS has been live for 15 months.

According to survey results released yesterday by Santa Cruz, Calif.-based research firm Evans Data, only eight percent of developers in North America are currently developing applications to run on Microsoft Vista, even though the operating system has been live now for 15 months.

The study also states that while development for Vista is expected to rise to 24 percent in 2009, it will continue to lag behind Windows XP development, with 29 percent of those surveyed expecting to continue to create apps for the previous-generation operating system.

Overall, 69 percent of developers said they expect to develop for Windows in 2009, and 15 percent for Linux, according to a summary of the report released to journalists.

Evans Data's President and CEO John Andrews said that the results show developers have a "wait-and-see approach" when it comes to Vista.

"The new operating system has had more than its share of problems and the desire to move from XP...is still lagging," he commented in a prepared statement. "That coupled with interest in alternative operating systems is suppressing development activity and that in turn will further erode Vista's acceptance."

In terms of development tools, the company says its survey showed that Visual Studio Team System's "usage rate" is lagging behind IBM's Rational Suite and Subversion. From a development methodology standpoint, two-thirds of corporate developers are expected to use agile development techniques (up from "more than half" currently). Evans Data did not disclose further details on either of these two findings.

About the Author

Becky Nagel is vice president of AI for 1105 Media, where she specializes in training internal and external customers on maximizing their business potential via a wide variety of generative AI technologies as well as developing cutting-edge AI content and events. She's the author of "ChatGPT Prompt 101 Guide for Business Uses," regularly leads research studies on generative AI business usage, and serves as the director of AI Boardroom, a new resource for C-level executives looking to excel in the AI era. Prior to her current position she was a technical leader for 1105 Media's Web, advertising and production teams as well as editorial director for a suite of enterprise technology publications, including serving as founding editor of PureAI.com. She has 20 years of enterprise technology journalism experience, and regularly speaks and writes about generative AI, AI, edge computing and other cutting-edge technologies. She can be reached at [email protected].

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